Services
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Pediatric Therapy


 

 
 

HFM Pediatric Therapy
HFM Medical Center
2300 Western Ave.
Manitowoc, WI
(920) 320-2850
 

   
Holy Family Memorial’s Pediatric Therapy Services are provided in the home, clinic, or community service agency, such as a day care. A staff of occupational, physical, and speech therapists see children from birth to adolescence.

Children are generally referred for therapy through their physician, specialty hospitals, community agencies, or the Manitowoc County Birth to Three Program. Holy Family Memorial currently has  contract with the Manitowoc County Birth to Three Program to provide therapy services for children ages birth to three. This is an individually guided, family centered program of early intervention services that is available to help families meet the developmental needs of their children.

Following the intake procedure, children are referred for an initial evaluation to determine if the child is eligible for services.

Pediatric Physical therapy
Pediatric physical therapy focuses on evaluating movement patterns and the attainment of gross motor skills. These skills include rolling, sitting, crawling, standing, walking, jumping, kicking, and throwing, and allow a child to move safely in his or her environment. Gross motor skills are dependent upon normal muscle tone, strength, endurance, coordination, and balance. Children who may benefit from working with a pediatric physical therapist include, but are not limited to those with cerebral palsy, hydrocephalus, spina bifida, prematurity, Down Syndrome, muscular dystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, torticollis, and other neurological, developmental, neuromuscular, genetic, bone disorders, and seizure disorders.

Pediatric Occupational therapy
Pediatric occupational therapy focuses on the evaluation and treatment of fine motor, self-help, and sensory processing skills. These skills, which involve eye-hand coordination, visual perception, manipulation, dressing, feeding, grooming, and adaptive behavioral responses, allow a child to interact with his or her environment. The goal of occupational therapy in pediatrics is to maximize independence in the above areas. Children who may benefit from working with a pediatric occupational therapist include, but are not limited to those with cerebral palsy, prematurity, Attention Deficit Disorder, genetic disorders such as Down Syndrome, or Fragile X Syndrome, autism, muscular disorders such as muscular dystrophy, and irritable infants including those with colic behaviors.

Pediatric Speech therapy
Pediatric speech therapy focuses on the evaluation and treatment of language, communication, oral motor, and swallowing skills. Language skills include the child’s ability to understand with is being said; communication skills include the child’s ability to communicate wants and needs. Oral motor skills assist with improving the child’s skill in being understood by family and other people, and the child’s ability to chew and swallow safely. Children who may benefit from working with a pediatric speech therapist include, but are not limited to those with autism, cerebral palsy, seizure disorders, prematurity, developmental delays, and genetic disorders including Down Syndrome and Fragile X Syndrome.

Common questions about your child:

Should I ever put my child on his/her tummy?
Yes!!! Physicians recommend that children don’t sleep on their tummies, but play time on tummies helps:
            • Strengthen the child’s back, hips, and shoulders, which is essential to sitting, crawling, standing and walking
            • Breathing and breath control in order to help calm the child and have enough air to talk
            • The child uses eyes and arms at a distance that most learning takes place in school

Is there any benefit to purchasing baby walkers, Johnny Jump-ups, Exersaucers, etc.?
Parents raised children without them for many years! However, there is some benefit with limited use. Too much (longer than 30 minutes) and/or too early (before six months) can lead to walking on toes and actually delays walking.

Are sippy cups okay?
No!!! Generally we recommend that children go from a bottle to a cup at about 12 months of age. The suck of a sippy cup is the same as on a bottle, which can delay speech development. Straws and straw cups with lids are great!

Does my child need to crawl before walking?
Yes!!! It helps them develop strength and control of their trunk, back, hips, and shoulders, which is essential before standing.

At what age should I expect my child to start talking?
Your child should begin to speak their first words at 12 months, and by 24 months should be able to speak a minimum of 50 words, and put two words together.